Category:

Mold

Mody Air Conditioner

Reducing Mold in Your Home May Start with Your Air Conditioner

As recent news coverage here in Tampa revealed, a home is meant to protect you and your family from the outside elements, not expose you to a host of allergens, airborne irritants, and toxins that can make you ill. The biggest potential problem — as we covered through a post titled Responding to the Mold Outbreak at VA Bay Pines Center — is mold, but other airborne irritants can also pose a problem, such as pet dander, dust, and dust mites. In this post, we encourage you to reduce your exposure to indoor airborne irritants and provide guidance to reduce the levels of airborne irritants in your home.

Keep the Air Conditioning on in the Summer

Mold grows best in warm, humid conditions, so it makes sense that air conditioning is one of the most powerful weapons in the battle against mold. One of the most effective ways to prevent mold from getting a foothold in your home is to keep your air conditioner(s) running during the hot, humid days of summer. In addition to cooling your home, air conditioning removes humidity from the air, and low humidity (ideally between 30 and 50 percent) inhibits mold growth.

Mody Air Conditioner

Unfortunately, a poorly maintained heating, air-conditioning, and ventilation (HVAC) system can be a breeding ground for mold and facilitate the spread continue reading

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Other Waste-Basket Diagnoses

Many people who suffer chronic pain and fatigue find little to no relief from conventional medicine. At best, they are given what we refer to as a “waste-basket diagnosis,” such as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), fibromyalgia, or depression. Worse yet, the doctor runs numerous tests and explains that all the results came back normal — the implication being that the symptoms are all in the patient’s head.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

The problem with these waste-basket diagnoses is that they are unscientific. Conventional medicine has no test for chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, or depression. Doctors arrive at these diagnoses in one of two ways:

  • They look at a cluster of symptoms and assign it a label. If the patient complains primarily of pain, he or she is likely to be diagnosed as having fibromyalgia. If fatigue is the primary complaint, the patient is diagnosed as having chronic fatigue syndrome. If the symptoms are mood-related, the patient is diagnosed as suffering from depression.
  • They rule out other possible diagnoses and choose from among the remaining waste-basket diagnoses. For example, they may test for common infections, run an electrocardiogram, test blood sugar and iron levels, and when all the tests come back negative, conclude that the patient must have chronic fatigue syndrome or depression.

Comparing Symptoms

Chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and depression have common symptoms, including the following: continue reading

Depression and Mold

Understanding the Link Between Depression and Mold

Living and working in Tampa, Florida, as we do, we witness on a weekly basis at least one patient who displays signs of mold sickness and depression. We can put much of the blame for this malady on water-damaged buildings, which are found in abundance in our humid, damp, tropical southern climate.

Depression and Mold

Because of these climate-specific surroundings, we almost always ask our patients about their living and working environment, because we are strong believers in the notion that there isa direct link between water-damaged buildings that can cause mold sickness and associated depression.

Mold-related Signs of Depression

Some signs of depression — no matter the cause — often include the following: continue reading

Florida Conference Focuses on Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

“Mold Sickness” is an immunologic disease that is brought about by exposure to the interior environment of a water-damaged building that becomes a haven for toxic microbes and harmful chemicals. These “dangerous buildings” promote the growth of bacteria, microbes, fragments of microbes, and fungi, and residents or people working in these buildings who are harmed by these conditions often suffer a systemic inflammatory response syndrome known as Chronic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (CIRS).

Physicians, researchers, medical providers and indoor environmental experts have been studying CIRS for years, and much progress has been made. And late last month, during a four-day conference convened in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., current breakthroughs and updates about the mold epidemic facing this country were presented.

Meeting of the Minds

Called Meeting of the Minds, the conference was attended by BioDesign Wellness Center’s own functionally medicine-trained Dr. Matt Lewis, DC, DACBN, CFMP®; and BioDesign medical director Dr. Winston Cope, M.D. During the conference, Dr. Lewis passed his certification test for the Shoemaker Protocol and is currently completing that certification. The protocol features the most recent advances in the understanding and treatment of CIRS.

One of the more dismaying effects of this debilitating condition are the number of symptoms that can arise as a result of the sufferer residing or working in a water-damaged building. According to Dr. Richie Shoemaker of the Center for continue reading

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